Culture can affect ethical standards and shape business behavior

Some schools allow individuals to decide their "definition of the situation" mdash; what the organization is about and how individuals should act in it.

They get to understand that we are serious about education and that we are serious about them going to college. In such situations, individuals are likely to arrive at their own definitions of the situation, which makes work toward common goals difficult.

What is vision really, and what are its pieces and parts?. Students carry themselves with poise and confidence. But vision can be a very Culture can affect ethical standards and shape business behavior and fuzzy concept, leading to vague and fuzzy definitions of the situation.

Effective schools, however, suggest a clear, common "definition of the situation" for all individuals, sending a constant stream of unambiguous signals to students and teachers about what their roles and responsibilities are.

School Culture: The Hidden Curriculum

They need to start thinking about it now to get where they need to be. Of course, no one suggests that changing culture is simple, easy, or quick. Students receive little guidance and are left to come up with their own answers to the question, "What am I here for? Gaining a deep understanding of what a strong, positive organizational culture looks like and how it works can help educators become more thoughtful about developing one.

A large study of middle school climate involving 30, students in Chicago Public Schools found that social support has a positive effect on academic achievement but only when coupled with a climate of strong "academic press.

Thomas, a pioneer in the field, observed that individuals consider something he called "the definition of the situation" before they act. Two years ago, the Hay Group set out to answer that question.

Very young children impose their own self-centered definitions on most situations, but society gradually suggests or imposes other definitions.

The school does that through its organizational culture. Visitors to the school are encouraged to ask students what class they are in, and students invariably provide their intended college graduation date. Back to Top Making it Strong: For example, school leaders might talk about values and beliefs, but no follow-up actions, traditions, ceremonies, or rituals reinforce those messages.

As Michael Fullan puts it, "Reculturing is a contact sport that involves hard, labor-intensive work. Perhaps that is because factors such as strong leadership, close monitoring of student progress, a common and coherent curriculum, and teacher collaboration all seem like pieces of the puzzle that educators can directly affect.

Teachers talk about their work with intensity and professionalism. In their study of visionary companies, Collins and Porras found that "Many executives thrash about with mission statements and vision statements [ Craig Jerald Walk into any truly excellent school and you can feel it almost immediately — a calm, orderly atmosphere that hums with an exciting, vibrant sense of purposefulness.

This is a positive school culture, the kind that improves educational outcomes. Vision and values As Elmont and University Park illustrate, at the heart of every positive culture is a positive vision for students and staff. Focusing attention and daily behavior on what is important and valued.

Rather, relational trust is forged in daily social exchanges. According to Peterson and Deal, students "know things are different in a positive or negative way — something more than just rules or procedures. In contrast, effective schools make sure that even the smallest aspects of daily life align with the core ideology and envisioned future.

And despite the sense of serious business at hand, both teachers and students seem happy and confident rather than stressed. Trust grows over time through exchanges where the expectations held for others are validated in action. One useful definition of vision comes from James Collins and Jerry Porras, who conducted a research study of "visionary companies" that had sustained successful outcomes over long periods of time.

But educators in highly effective schools, especially those that serve large populations of disadvantaged students, do not seem to regard the organizational culture as beyond their control. Even if the climate is pleasant and orderly, it is likely that teachers quietly disagree on what their primary responsibilities are and what the main purpose of the institution is, making improvement planning and instructional collaboration nonproductive.

For example, fifth graders who enter Washington, D. Walk into any truly excellent school and you can feel it almost immediately — a calm, orderly atmosphere that hums with an exciting, vibrant sense of purposefulness just under the surface.

Analyzing an extensive body of research on organizational culture, leadership and change experts Terrance Deal and Kent Peterson contend that "the culture of an enterprise plays the dominant role in exemplary performance. Amplifying energy and motivation of staff members and students.

According to Bryk and Schneider, "Relational trust is not something that can be achieved simply through some workshop, retreat, or form of sensitivity training, although all of these can be helpful. But Key Academy envelops students in a ubiquitous and infectious set of symbols, ceremonies, and traditions that foster ambition and effort focused on the unifying vision — preparing every single student to go to college.

To be sure, many middle schools encourage students to begin thinking about college. The core ideology is monitored, reinforced, and supported.Walk into any truly excellent school and you can feel it almost immediately — a calm, orderly atmosphere that hums with an exciting, vibrant sense of purposefulness.

This is a positive school culture, the kind that improves educational outcomes. Ethics is a key component of good governance (Perry et al. ) and has significant potential to affect public trust in all forms of government (Joyce ).Previous research has identified a number of factors that can shape standards of conduct within an organization, among which the role of leadership has attracted significant attention (Grojean et al.

; Steinbauer et al. ).

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Culture can affect ethical standards and shape business behavior
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